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PostPosted: Dec 10th, '17, 11:54 
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Hi all

After reading the forum, I realized it was my cheap red lava rock media that caused my ph in my basement pond not coming down. I tested with vinegar and see bubbles. Anyway, I have already removed the red lava rocks and cleaned all the filters with around 70% water change. However, I still see high ph at 8.4 My tap water is around 7.5-7.6 with very high KH. I have cleaned the bottom of the tank as well and the filters and my grow bed are empty now. In the filter, I have the ceramic ring and Koi Filter Media. I understand that nitrification process should be able to take care this time without those rocks, but my concern is the water still at 8.4 after the 70% water change...


Also, I bought a gallon of General Hydroponics pH Down Liquid Fertilizer, but every time it goes back up. For instance, I added in the morning to reduce the ph down to 7.6, but it raises back up to 8.4 next day... Any idea what I should do here? Thanks in advance!


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PostPosted: Dec 10th, '17, 12:47 
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When you say "bubbles", were they very, very fine bubbles rising in continuous streams, or larger occasional bubbles?

I have doubts that lava rock would contain limestone and from what you've described it's all to do with high carbonate levels in the source water.

The pH of tap water treated with Chlorine or Chloramine will rise from it's original pH over the first 24-48hrs after coming out of the tap. Here in Perth for example, in most areas it comes out of the tap at around 7.8-8.0 and rises to about 8.2-8.4 within 24hrs as the Chlorine gasses off.

If you have high carbonate water, adding acid directly to the system will only cause short terms drops in the pH which will then bounce right back up to the original pH within hours. See this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=25680&hilit=high+carbonate+treat+hydrochloric+acid

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PostPosted: Dec 10th, '17, 13:10 
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Mr Damage wrote:
When you say "bubbles", were they very, very fine bubbles rising in continuous streams, or larger occasional bubbles?

I have doubts that lava rock would contain limestone and from what you've described it's all to do with high carbonate levels in the source water.

The pH of tap water treated with Chlorine or Chloramine will rise from it's original pH over the first 24-48hrs after coming out of the tap. Here in Perth for example, in most areas it comes out of the tap at around 7.8-8.0 and rises to about 8.2-8.4 within 24hrs as the Chlorine gasses off.

If you have high carbonate water, adding acid directly to the system will only cause short terms drops in the pH which will then bounce right back up to the original pH within hours. See this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=25680&hilit=high+carbonate+treat+hydrochloric+acid



Thanks for your quick reply. Yes, the bubbles are in continuous streams. I have this pond for over two years now, does the water change with 70% caused a new cycling process?

Also, will too much aeration (3 large airstones) caused the ph to not come down too? I added 3 pictures below, again, thanks !


https://www.dropbox.com/s/7cp5qlc6u279l ... M.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ko9nw931n3sus ... M.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hl22tvn6rjd2i ... M.jpg?dl=0


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PostPosted: Dec 12th, '17, 13:53 
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Nope on the 70% water change question.

Doing a 70% water change on a well established, fully cycled system, won't cause you to have to cycle the system again... Unless you used chlorinated water, then it may have crashed the bacteria colony, but it would bounce back very quickly, much more quickly than cycling a new system from scratch.

Just an FYI, if there are fish in a system, water changes should be limited to 30%

Also nope on the aeration question. In fact good aeration would stimulate more activity in the nitrifying bacteria, so faster and more effective nitrification, which will lead to a faster decline in the system pH.

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PostPosted: Dec 22nd, '17, 05:06 
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OK, quick update, I have finally got the PH stable at 7.8 from 8.4 using the method from your on treating water in a separate drum. I will continue to waiting and treating the water until it hit 6.8.

Just curious I saw some post about spray iron directly to the plant. Does that mean I can start my plant now if I spray EDDHA iron mix with water? If so, how much and how often. Again, thanks


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PostPosted: Dec 22nd, '17, 10:54 
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I would only keep treating the water until you get it down to about 7.5. Don't be in a rush to drop it further, it will do it itself and when it does you'll be wishing you still had those carbonates in the water. Hydrochoric acid (Muriatic or Pool acid) is the best option.

Plants will be fine at a pH of 7.5, even 7.8.

Plants could have, and probably should have gone in at day one. Even at the initial high pH you would've achieved good plant growth with the addition of some EDDHA chelated Iron. Simply add the EDDHA Iron into the water in the system at 1/2 a level teaspoon (use proper measuring spoons) per 1000L

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PostPosted: Jan 3rd, '18, 03:54 
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Thanks for the advice! Everything works like a charm now in my setup. PH stable at 7.3 without adding any acid for the last weeks. Plants are growing.

So just curious about supplementing iron when needed or when it shows chlorosis, can I spray the DTPA solution or EDDHA solution directly into the plant's leave or root? I am trying to avoid a dark red or tea pond. If spraying is ok, how much and how often?


Thanks again for all the help


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