All times are UTC + 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Jul 15th, '19, 21:36 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Jul 9th, '19, 00:46
Posts: 16
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Upstate NY
Hello,

Will this solution be ok to use in aquaponic system?


Attachments:
Capture.JPG
Capture.JPG [ 106.17 KiB | Viewed 635 times ]
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
    Advertisement
 
PostPosted: Jul 16th, '19, 16:42 
Offline
A posting God
A posting God
User avatar

Joined: Apr 4th, '11, 13:18
Posts: 2327
Gender: Male
Are you human?: Not before 8am
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Neither are really used in Aquaponics.

This pH Down will most likely be Phosphoric acid, which isn't really desirable in Aquaponics, as too much could lead to algal blooms.

Plus, depending on what the starting pH of a new system is, in most situations you are best leaving it alone and allowing it to drop naturally on it's own over time, which it will.

If it is over about 8.2 when starting out, you could use a little Hydrochloric acid (Muriatic) to drop the pH to just below 8.0, then leave it to drop naturally on it's own over time. The beneficial bacteria prefer a slightly alkaline environment, as do most fish. The Chloride in Hydrochloric acid is also beneficial to fish health.

The pH up in this set will most likely be Potassium hydroxide, again, not desirable in Aquaponics, because when the pH starts dropping in an aquaponic system, it's because the carbonates in the water are being consumed by naturally occurring acids, so you want a product that will both raise AND buffer pH. Potassium hydroxide will only raise the pH, but won't add buffering capacity, which basically means you'll have to add much more and far more frequently.

As far as raising pH is concerned, you shouldn't have to do that for some time with a new system, probably months. When the pH starts dropping naturally, catch it and maintain in the high 7's using products that are also beneficial to the plants, such as Calcium carbonate, Calcium Magnesium carbonate, Potassium bicarbonote, etc.

_________________
Mr Damage - a.k.a: Yabbies
Owner at Perth Aquaponics - Aquaponic Consultant & Trainer
Trade certified Horticulturist & Cert IV TAE


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 17th, '19, 00:46 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 8852
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Mr Damage wrote:
When the pH starts dropping naturally, catch it and maintain in the high 7's


I'd shoot lower than that. probably 6.8 to 7.2 if you're trying to optimize plant growth (usually best for vegetables in the pH 6 to 7 range). Most fish will do their best in the pH 6.5 to 8.5 range (breeding range) (they can go lower and higher though). The bacteria like a higher pH for nitrification (7.5 to 8.0) but will do conversion well enough down to about pH 6.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 17th, '19, 05:00 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Jul 9th, '19, 00:46
Posts: 16
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Upstate NY
So I guess what do I use for ph up and down for aquaponics


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 17th, '19, 07:58 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 8852
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Hydrochloric acid (aka muriatic acid) for pH down. Eventually you'll be adjusting the pH up. There are a lot of options for adjusting the pH up - carbonates, bicarbonates and hydroxides.

Examples of things you could use for adjusting the pH up -
Shell grit or coral or some other source of CaCO3
Potassium Carbonate or Potassium Bicarbonate
Potassium Hydroxide or Calcium Hydroxide - These don't provide any help with buffering the pH up but they can be used to raise the pH.

I use a combination of crushed coral and Potassium bicarbonate to raise the pH. I keep the coral in a mesh bag so that I can put it in or take it out depending on how the pH is doing. Usually the pH keeps going down very slowly even with the coral in the system and at some point I'll add potassium bicarbonate to bring the pH back up and supply some potassium.

Every system is a bit different in terms of how much to use and you only want to adjust the system water in 0.3 or 0.4 pH units at a time to avoid stressing the fish. Try adjusting a known volume of system water and see how much it takes. It's a good idea to let the adjusted sample sit for a couple of hours because the pH may drift and you may need to adjust it a second time. The ratio of the amount used to adjust the sample to the sample volume should equal the ratio of the amount needed to adjust the system to the system volume. This will allow you to calculate the amount needed for the whole system. Hope this makes sense


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 17th, '19, 10:30 
Offline
A posting God
A posting God
User avatar

Joined: Apr 4th, '11, 13:18
Posts: 2327
Gender: Male
Are you human?: Not before 8am
Location: Perth, Western Australia
scotty435 wrote:
Mr Damage wrote:
When the pH starts dropping naturally, catch it and maintain in the high 7's


I'd shoot lower than that. probably 6.8 to 7.2 if you're trying to optimize plant growth (usually best for vegetables in the pH 6 to 7 range). Most fish will do their best in the pH 6.5 to 8.5 range (breeding range) (they can go lower and higher though). The bacteria like a higher pH for nitrification (7.5 to 8.0) but will do conversion well enough down to about pH 6.

Good spot Scotty, Cheers!... A typo there locchamp, that should've been high 6's, not high 7's. Too many things on mind, typing too quickly.

_________________
Mr Damage - a.k.a: Yabbies
Owner at Perth Aquaponics - Aquaponic Consultant & Trainer
Trade certified Horticulturist & Cert IV TAE


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 17th, '19, 19:38 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Jul 9th, '19, 00:46
Posts: 16
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Upstate NY
thanks all


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 18th, '19, 00:54 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 8852
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
I should mention that with the crushed coral I adjust the system directly by just putting the mesh bag under a grow bed spigot. Most CaCO3 sources could probably be used this way because the pH changes they cause are relatively slow.

Cheers Mr Damage :wave:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 18th, '19, 07:34 
Offline
Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: Dec 1st, '18, 23:55
Posts: 84
Gender: Male
Location: UK
scotty435 wrote:
I should mention that with the crushed coral I adjust the system directly by just putting the mesh bag under a grow bed spigot. Most CaCO3 sources could probably be used this way because the pH changes they cause are relatively slow.

Surely if the PH is low (like low 6s - high 5s),the crushed coral will dissolve quicker?

_________________
:headbang: :headbang: :headbang:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 19th, '19, 10:02 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 8852
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Yes, that's true but keep in mind that you're fighting the effects of nitrification too. In my case it's sometimes not dissolving enough to counter the nitrification and that's why the pH keeps dropping - you need the addition of something like potassium bicarbonate that dissolves easier. You do have to watch the pH and remove the mesh bag occasionally (especially if your not feeding much) but it takes long enough to change the pH that I am not concerned especially since this would probably max out at a pH of 8.2 (I've never had it get this high though). Using something with potassium is also a plus. Hope this makes sense to you.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Jul 20th, '19, 12:59 
Offline
Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: Dec 1st, '18, 23:55
Posts: 84
Gender: Male
Location: UK
scotty435 wrote:
Yes, that's true but keep in mind that you're fighting the effects of nitrification too. In my case it's sometimes not dissolving enough to counter the nitrification and that's why the pH keeps dropping - you need the addition of something like potassium bicarbonate that dissolves easier. You do have to watch the pH and remove the mesh bag occasionally (especially if your not feeding much) but it takes long enough to change the pH that I am not concerned especially since this would probably max out at a pH of 8.2 (I've never had it get this high though). Using something with potassium is also a plus. Hope this makes sense to you.

:thumbleft: Thanks

_________________
:headbang: :headbang: :headbang:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Portal by phpBB3 Portal © phpBB Türkiye
[ Time : 0.080s | 20 Queries | GZIP : Off ]