All times are UTC + 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1555 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 ... 104  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Nov 20th, '15, 11:29 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Read back a couple of posts and you'll know :thumbright:

scotty435 wrote:
I've had good luck with using Red Russian Kale as an indicator plant, it has always been one of the first to show deficiencies in potassium and iron.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
    Advertisement
 
PostPosted: Nov 20th, '15, 20:18 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
scotty435 wrote:
Read back a couple of posts and you'll know :thumbright:

scotty435 wrote:
I've had good luck with using Red Russian Kale as an indicator plant, it has always been one of the first to show deficiencies in potassium and iron.


Ah, any ideas for a warm/hot weather crop? The red russian kale also seems to be the first one to give up to the heat or to pests as the heat gets bad here so it is only good from Nov through perhaps April if I'm lucky.

I don't have much trouble tracking the Iron but it would be nice to have something notify me of the potassium before the basil and tomatoes suffer, especially because the potassium tests are so hard to read.

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 04:03 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Different story around here. I can and do use kale for most of the year. I'll give you a few good guesses as to what I think will work.

Basil might work for warm weather areas but it also gets potassium deficiency when it gets too cold so it wouldn't be accurate under certain conditions. It's also more susceptible to fungal problems which can make the leaves go yellow. I keep basil pinched back, I'm not sure what affect letting it go to seed would have on it's ability to indicate potassium problems.

There are plenty of other warm weather plants with high potasium requirements but I'd look at bean plants for sure and possibly sweet potato plants and collard greens.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 04:16 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
Hum, I'll have to test out the Beans as a potassium indicator. I like to grow yardlong beans as the weather gets warm.

Sweet potato tends to grow nuts around here (can really take over, and since it is tricky to get it to produce in Aquaponics it might not be all that helpful overall.)

I think basil is probably a good indicator too, I just need to learn to read it better since most years as the plants get big I seem to just keep adding and adding potassium and never seem to catch up and then I start questioning myself as to what is wrong with the plants or if it is really potassium (or perhaps I was seeing Magnesium deficiency too.)

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 04:23 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
Anyway, today I did my normal
Iron and seaweed doses.
I also added 10 lb of epsom salts to the raft/tower system (I noticed the Kohlrabi showing what I suspect is Magnesium deficiency too.)
and
5 lb of epsom salts to the media bed system

Hopefully we will see that russian kale green up again.

Oh, and you recommendation on the Collard Greens as a warm weather indicator. UH, here in the hot wet south, collards are really not a warm weather crop, they are basically the same as all the other brassicas and Kale in my book here. In fact the Toscano Kale usually seems to outlive the others into the heat but generally before August I've given all of them up.

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 04:58 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
That's too bad, so much for collard greens or any other brassicas then :dontknow:.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 09:59 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
yea, and they are some of my favorite crops too, just can't really grow them through the Hot season and it can be tricky to get them past seedling stage during the warm seasons as well.
I sometimes think I need a bigger air conditioned seedling space but that gets costly.

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 11:28 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
TCLynx wrote:
I like to grow yardlong beans as the weather gets warm.


I've tried them a couple of times but so far they haven't found a spot they like. I put most of the beans in the greenhouse during the summer and they take off. The greenhouse isn't big enough for climbers like the yardlongs. Mostly grow blue lake bush beans and some other violet colored bush beans that I don't remember the name of at the moment.

The yardlong beans are good and make a good stir-fried pork and green beans

http://members.iinet.net.au/~mangodavid/html/R66.htm

The recipe is from this book and it has some other really good recipes - http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Class-Books-Cookery-Collection/dp/0864115148/ref=sr_1_5?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1448072357&sr=8-5&keywords=thai+cooking+class.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '15, 22:35 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
I've grown Red Noodle and another green variety of the Long beans. They are good to grow here in this sub-tropical climate. I haven't really been good at growing many other types of beans here except occasionally in soil.
I tend to grow climbers when it comes to crops that give me the choice
and
Indeterminates when it comes to tomato.

I like things that give continuous ongoing supplies of things rather than all at once. But I'm not restricted by greenhouse space and we have a pretty much year round growing season provided you can wrap your head around the backwards growing seasons here. (If there is a down time in the garden here it is late summer.)

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '15, 02:04 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
TCLynx wrote:
I like things that give continuous ongoing supplies of things rather than all at once.
.

Me too. I'm not growing things on the same scale as you but with the exception of beans. I'd rather not get too much at one time. The bush beans are pretty easy here and give good yields over several weeks. I stagger the crops but in different areas. Spider mites really seem to like the beans so if they get too bad in one area I'll just pull the plants. Saves some hassle with spraying. Last time I pulled some badly infested beans, where the spider mites were spreading onto the adjacent basil - the spider mites abandoned the basil as well. Apparently some types need a critical mass to be desperate enough to infest something they don't really care for :dontknow:

I go with mostly indeterminate tomatoes and day neutral strawberries. Other than that, most of the leafy greens I do as cut and come again and I'll usually wait for the secondary small heads off of brocolli. Lot of the leaves go to the chickens or the compost (eventually it all winds up as compost). Chickens are big fans of the Russian Red Kale (probably not good to give them too much though). Getting crops that head up finished is just about impossible here between the birds, caterpillars, and the slugs (unless I want to net them off) so I don't do much with these and what I do try usually winds up with the chickens. The chickens are getting pretty spoiled :) .


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '15, 08:08 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
Yea, our chickens get pretty spoiled too. Mainly because they get fresh ground twice a day and kitchen scraps and lettuce harvest scraps plus free choice commercial feed and usually a cup of scratch as well. (at least that is the trend with the chickens in the mobile shelter.) We have a couple odd girls who live basically free range with the goats because the chickens in the shelter picked on them too much and they kept escaping and as long as they don't run away, the dogs don't chase them down.

I haven't hand spider mite problems since I had to take down the greenhouse at the Old house. My big problem here is the sucking bugs (leaf footed bugs, squash bugs, stink bugs.) Those things are not killed by much of anything other than actually managing to squish them and of course it stinks when you do that and the leaf footed bugs fly really well. The AzaMax (extract from neem) messes with their reproduction but then you just wind up with lots of really big nymphs that you still need to squish. Sigh, we need some beneficials that will attack them!!!! Caterpillars, aphids, and whitefly seem almost easy to deal with after the leaf footed bugs!

Broccoli for us, cut and come again with the small stuff works fine. For market, I have to do the larger heads of the broccoli and romaneska and just keep re-planting. Last year I really only had a 40' row of each but they sold out almost before I had them listed on the market site so this year I'm trying to grow much more of them and trying to keep up a planting schedule for them too.

Now I just need to figure out how to keep the rodents (rats and/or squirrels) from pulling up the snow and snap pea seedlings!

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '15, 08:45 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Yep chickens sure love to get meat, don't laugh but Italian roast beef is their new favorite :headbang: . Mine are going through molt right now and need to make some feathers so I've upped their protein a bit.

Market produce is a whole different beast that's for certain.

I'm glad that so far I haven't seen too many of the leaf footed or squash bugs. I think it's cool enough most of the time to keep them in check but it probably helps that there aren't many people with gardens near by.

Cheers


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 23rd, '15, 01:40 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
I'd never even heard of Leaf footed bugs till I started gardening down here. They seem to be a Hot climate pest, well at least the ones we have.

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 23rd, '15, 01:52 
Offline
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
User avatar

Joined: Dec 6th, '07, 01:13
Posts: 10702
Images: 0
Location: central FL
Gender: Female
Are you human?: YES at least mostly
Location: USA, Florida, Yalaha
OK,
New system modification. Raft/tower system main tank.
It is already running dual drains and has a vertical inlet manifold.
I've been using a home built parabolic screen but the bio-slime does clog it up so almost all the water goes to the waste outlet most of the time.
SO,
Plan now. An RFF or RFS (depending on if you want to call it a filter or settler) on the center drain outlet.
And then an upflow filter that gets the flow from the main outlet plus the clean outlet of the RFF.
Unfortunately I don't have the budget to buy cone bottom tanks at this point so I'm just going to have to do my best with the 32 gallon Rubbermaid cans.
Saddly I think the RFF really needs to be a 50 gallon container to get the 20 minute resident time.
But then again, reading on some Koi forums, the upflow filter could probably handle ALL the flow/solids without doing the dual drain provided I do the flush daily. SO I'm not sure I should even be bothering with the dual drain and the RFF at this point.

The "waste" is being sent to a 300 gallon tank to get aeration and time to mineralize before allowing the clear water to trickle back to the system. I plan to put some form of settler and upflow filter inline between the mineralization tank and the sump tank.

_________________
Aquaponic Lynx
TCLynx Bought The Farm
Old Main System
Old 300 gallon System


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Nov 23rd, '15, 07:08 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 9097
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
I'm not sure what the Koi forum considers an up flow filter (pressurized or unpressurized). Either way one or a pair of these would work and probably take less space. You could mod a pool filter or go with a bucket or two.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1555 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 ... 104  Next

All times are UTC + 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 46 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Portal by phpBB3 Portal © phpBB Türkiye
[ Time : 0.139s | 16 Queries | GZIP : Off ]