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 Post subject: Medications
PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 20:32 
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Got my Melafix Pond Care in the mail today. Was concerned to see that the directions for use contain the statement "DO NOT USE on fish intended for human consumption". It also says "FOR ORNAMENTAL POND USE ONLY".

Now I am thinking that this might just be on their as a risk management tool / to indemnify themselves from someoned doing something foolish like eating the fish straight after dosing it up.

The active constituent is stated as Cajeput Oil 45.8 g/L.

This oil is used in aromatherapy. A quote from web says:

"Cajeput melaleuca leucadendron
Cajeput is an aromatherapy oil with a fresh, camphorous fragrance, with a fruity scent. It may be used in the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, coughs, muscle aches, oily skin, rheumatism, sinusitis, sore throat, and spots.

Safety Precautions: May cause skin irritation."

What do people reckon about using this. Should I steer clear - afterall there is nothing to state what else is in the stuff (though probably water).

Nick - do you have opinion on this?

Will be really disappointed if I can't use this stuff.


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PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 20:41 
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VB, obviously this is only my opnion, but i think it would be ok to use, and i would use it myself.

I think with many things a certain testing proceedure must be followed and certification obtained for materials or products to be certified safe for foodcontact or livestock treatment.

It is an un-nessecary expense for the company when 100% of their intended clients will only use this in their ornamental ponds, so yes, i think it is a disclaimer.

I assume you're not going to be using it as permanant addition to your water on a regular basis, so unless it contains cumulative poisons (unlikely) i think it sould be ok.

You could always try and email the manufacturer for a list of other ingredients contained in it, long shot but they may answer. (just don't mention that you will be using it in anythoing other than ornamental pond or they will just give you the "company line" and clam up.

I would also be surprised if it contained much else other than waster and the oil.

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 Post subject: Re: Medications
PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 20:54 
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Check this out Steve - found it by googling - it would appear to be the patent info. On the discussion group I found it there was discussion of making it yourself using 100% pure tea tree oil and a food grade emulsifier. Worth a thought (after I have used what I bought :oops: ).

You are correct in that I would not be using on an ongoing basis. After reading below - let me know if you still have same opinion re: safety. I guess the main issue is the type of emulsifier used, but it is not going to be in large quantity and what is the likelyhood it would be in fish system when you eat them or the plants much later down the track.

PS - given that I won't be using this Melafix a lot, I am unlikely to get through much of the bottle before it expires in March 2007. Expiry would be because of volatile nature of the oil. I wonder if I could freeze some. What do you reckon?

Quote:
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The active ingredient for the aquatic animal treatment method and composition of this invention is cajeput. As used herein, "cajeput", sometimes called cajuput or cajeputi or oil of tram, is the substance that is obtainable from the low growing shrub-like tree of the Melaleuca species, preferably Melaleuca cajuputi Powell (Myrtaceae) or Melaleuca leucadendron L. (Myrtaceae), which is indigenous to Southeast Asia. References to cajeput in this disclosure are intended to include cajeput oil, the most commonly available form of cajeput. Cajeput oil is typically produced by the known technique of hydrodistillation (steam distillation) of fresh leaves and twigs of the Melaleuca species. It is important to note that the cajeput utilized in this invention is a complex mixture of components normally found in cajeput oil, rather than a single component fractionally distilled and separated from cajeput, e.g., 1,8-cineole. Cajeput oil is produced in commercial quantities in Southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam, and is readily available from commercial suppliers of naturally derived food and cosmetic oils and extracts.

Cajeput oil is preferred in view of its commercial availability, but other forms of cajeput may also be used, e.g., cajeput extract in a liquid (solvent or another oil), cajeput adsorbed onto or absorbed into a solid carrier or substrate, or cajeput associated with other vehicles, provided that such vehicles are compatible with the administration of the cajeput into water harboring the aquatic animal to be treated and do not adversely affect the aquatic animal being treated or other beneficial aquatic life in the water.

Cajeput oil may be introduced directly into water containing aquatic animal to be treated, but it should be noted that cajeput oil is relatively insoluble in water. Consequently, direct addition of cajeput to water requires an effective means of dispersion, e.g., high speed or high shear mixing, and such intensive dispersion is preferably carried out in a localized region in the absence of the aquatic animal being treated to avoid injury; a metering/mixing pump or an inline mixer, e.g., mixing valve or orifice, may be used to accomplish the direct dispersion of cajeput in water.

A preferred technique for administering the cajeput in this invention involves the use of an aqueous mixture or dispersion of cajeput that is introduced into the water harboring the aquatic animal to be treated. The aqueous mixture or dispersion of cajeput is preferably introduced to the water containing the aquatic animal in a manner that ensures further mixing of the mixture or dispersion in the water. Such mixing should provide relatively uniform distribution of the cajeput throughout the water, so that the fish or other aquatic animals being treated are continually exposed to the cajeput as they swim in the water. In a small volume of water such as a fish hobbyist's fish aquarium, normally circulation of the water, e.g., via aeration of the water, typically provides good mixing and distribution of the cajeput through the aquarium water. If there is no filter pump or aerator or if circulation of the aquarium water is otherwise inadequate, the mixture or dispersion of cajeput may be simply poured in and the aquarium water gently stirred. For larger volumes of water harboring the fish or other aquatic animals to be treated, additional mechanical mixing may be required.

With respect to the aqueous mixture or dispersion containing cajeput used to treat small volumes of water, e.g., aquariums containing less than about 50 gal (190 l), vigorous shaking of cajeput and water in a sealed container of less than about 1 gal (3.8 l) is normally sufficient to provide an aqueous cajeput mixture suitable for use by the typical fish hobbyist. The aqueous cajeput mixture may then be introduced into the aquarium water by simply pouring the mixture into the aquarium.

A preferred cajeput composition of this invention is an aqueous mixture containing from about 0.1% to about 20% cajeput, more preferably from about 0.5% to about 10% cajeput and most preferably about 1% to about 5% cajeput, all percentages being by volume.

The aqueous cajeput-containing composition preferably contains an emulsifier in an amount sufficient to emulsify the cajeput oil in water, to provide a relatively stable emulsion. Preferred emulsifiers (sometimes called surfactants) are those which are nontoxic and noninjurious to the aquatic animal being treated, and these include food grade emulsifiers which are widely available.

Nonionic emulsifiers are especially preferred, with Crovol.TM. PK-70 nonionic emulsifier (Croda Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey, U.S.A.) being a highly preferred nonionic emulsifier that is water soluble.

The amount of emulsifier used to provide emulsification of the cajeput oil in water is generally not critical, and the concentration of emulsifier may range from about 0.01% to about 20%, more preferably about 0.1% to about 5%, all percentages being by volume. For emulsifiers or surfactants that are normally not liquid, the numerical concentration ranges just noted may be used, with percentages being by weight based on the volume of aqueous emulsion.

Other adjuvants besides emulsifiers may also be used, such as antifoams or defoamers, antioxidants, preservatives, coloring agents and the like. The adjuvants are typically present in the aqueous cajeput composition in minor amounts, i.e., less than about 5% by volume and preferably less than 1% by volume. All such adjuvants should be noninjurious and nontoxic to the fish and other aquatic animals being treated, as well as to other beneficial aquatic organisms present in the water along with the aquatic animal being treated, such as various types of invertebrates and plants.

A particularly preferred stable emulsified aqueous cajeput composition is as follows:


______________________________________
cajeput oil 1% by volume
emulsifier 1% by volume
defoamer 0.2% by volume
deionized water
97.8% by volume
______________________________________



The emulsifier is preferably Crovol.TM. PK-70 nonionic emulsifier (Croda Inc.) and the defoamer is preferably FG-10 antifoam (Dow-Corning Corp., Midland, Michigan, U.S.A.), the latter serving to control foaming otherwise caused by the emulsifier. The composition may be prepared by vigorously mixing the cajeput oil, emulsifier and defoamer in the deionized water, to produce an aqueous emulsion that is stabilized against separation of the cajeput oil from the aqueous phase. Such mixing may be carried out with a mechanical mixer or by manual shaking.

An aqueous mixture containing cajeput, e.g., 1% by volume, can be prepared without the emulsifier and defoamer, but such an aqueous mixture must be vigorously shaken (for 1-5 minutes) or mechanically agitated prior to use to disperse the cajeput oil uniformly throughout the aqueous phase.

Cajeput has been found to be extremely effective in providing complete recovery of afflicted fish or other aquatic animals even when used at low concentrations. For this reason, the present invention includes, as a preferred treatment, introducing cajeput into the water in which the afflicted aquatic animals are normally harbored or confined.

In the treatment method of this invention, the cajeput is introduced into the water containing the fish or other aquatic animal to be treated in an amount of from about 0.001 ml (1 microliter) to about 1 ml, preferably from about 0.01 ml (10 microliters) to about 0.5 ml (500 microliters), per day per 10 gallons (37.8 liters) of water containing the aquatic animal(s) being treated; these amounts are based on the volume of cajeput per se. This amount may be added as a single dosage each day, as is preferred, or may be added in aliquots of the daily dosage throughout the day.


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 Post subject: Re: Medications
PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 21:09 
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Cajeput is not from Australian Melaluca and therefore tea tree oil cannot be used as substitute.

"There is no much information around on melafix. Contrary to some rumours it is
not tea-tree oil but an extract of Melaueca cajeput (which apparently now grows
wild in the Florida swamps)."


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PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 21:17 
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Yep, still happy with using it, probably more so.

I's say that the used by date is due to most oils oxidising and becoming rancid over time exposure to light and oxygen.

I wouldn't freeze it, but keeping it cool and dark should help. (i think thats why the aquarium grade bottles are a dark blue.)

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 Post subject: Re: Medications
PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 21:39 
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Did the deed - put some in the aquarium. Think the fish are not too bad - but it is hard to tell as they are pretty much hiding all the time. I did see some wounds/fungus on a couple when I first put them in, so think it is a good addition to get them all healthy. Noticed one Jade tonight that doesn't look all that well. Tail looks funny, nearly like he is paralysed. Is not gasping and looks reasonably happy, so maybe he is just a mongy one and will live but will be mongy.


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PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 21:45 
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Do you have a quarantine /hospital tank? I keep one just in case I have sick fish which I might need to doctor/pamper back to full health.

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 Post subject: Re: Medications
PostPosted: Jul 26th, '06, 22:00 
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VB doesn't sound like its just the cajuput meleluca plant..........

Quote:
obtainable from the low growing shrub-like tree of the Melaleuca species, preferably Melaleuca cajuputi Powell (Myrtaceae) or Melaleuca leucadendron L. (Myrtaceae)


Don't know if this link helps........http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melaleuca

might try and some research tomorrow.

Steve

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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 14:28 
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sorry VB i got nothing on this stuff. I work in the dog and cats section of my pet shop, my knowledge of fish is pretty much what I have learnt here and a few other tidbits from the guys at work. :? sorry but I will ask at work and see if thy know anything, a few of them are studying marine studies at uni, will ask around for you. :)


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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 14:39 
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DO NOT GET TEA TREE OIL ANYWHERE NEAR YOUR FISH TANKS.....

You've just reminded me of a sorry tale that happened to me a few years ago.
I was minding an aquarium full of tropical marine fish for a friend. After applying tea tree oil to a minor skin fungal thing on my hands, I didn't even think, and about an hour later reached into the fish tank to get something out of it.

Within an hour or two every fish in his tank had died... :? So try and be concious of what may be on your hands, and others hands before dipping them in to tanks.

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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 14:49 
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eek! Wow, did not know that stuff was that bad - thanks a stack for that warning! :shock:

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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 16:20 
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Now i'm confused as shit. Cajeput is a strain of tea-trea, caeput oils smells like tea-tree. the amount on you hands would be less than the amount in the mela fix. Only thing i can think of is that it is somehow toxic to MARINE fish. Joel, you did say marine, yes?

Can any one clear this up for me, as it just doesn't add up.

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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 16:30 
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Tea tree oil must be properly mixed or blended as a medicine for fish. This takes a fair bit of work apparently as tea tree oil and water aren't exactly compatible. Putting oil that hasn't been integrated into water properly probably releases molecule sizes of it that clog fishes gills.

Like anything, in the right amounts. A tea tree oil home brew fish medicine will contain 1% oil. This is then added at the rate of 1 ml per 10 litres.

1 ppm.

This can be continued for 7 days amounting to 7 ppm before a water change is recommended in the medication regime.

7 ppm is quite high. So again I think it's not the tea tree oil that's toxic, it's the oil in it's 'solid' form.

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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 16:45 
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VB, does it say anyting about it beign suitable for MARINE setups? Though the pond strength stuff might not mention it, damn, i threw out the empty bottle i had.

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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '06, 17:18 
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Yes it was a marine set up, a nice fancy one with coral and crabs and lots of colourful salt water fish... Until I got to it....... :oops:

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