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PostPosted: Nov 8th, '18, 20:27 
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Location: Philippines, Bohol
The set-up has been about a month old so far.
This is my first time growing fish and plants, so it's kind of bold of me to do both at the same time. This is what my research has led me to do. I'm scared that I'm messing something up, so i really need your guys' help!

Here are my paramters:
-30 Gallons of distilled water (I used Seachem Replenish)
-10 Shubunkin goldfish (they were still small when I got them)
-20 red leaf lettuce (2 per pot)
-Hydroton balls as the media
-GH: 6
-KH: 4 (I added an alkaline buffer to raise it)

(as of November 8)
-Ammonia: ~0.25 (if ever ammonia spikes, I have my Prime ready)
-pH: 7.2

Feeding times:
-2.5mL of generic fish food 6AM and PM
-2.5mL freeze-dried bloodworms 12PM

Temp:
~33C during the day
<30 at night


Other notes:
-The system gets directly hit by morning light ONLY.
-0 fish have died so far (thankfully)
-No odd swimming patterns by fish observed (yet?)
-Fish aren't 24/7 on the surface, gasping for air
-The barrel has algae growing on its sides.
-There are hydroton dusts (and some balls, oops) at the bottom of the tank.
-The water is slightly cloudy, and there is a tint of green at the bottom of the tank
-Prior to fish added, it took 3 weeks to cycle the system (I used Stability)
-Barrel is painted white on the outside to help with cooling.

Please please please tell me if I'm messing my system up. I am so concerned for my fishes' health. I never knew I'd be this attached to them :'( I just feel like one day, I'll come back home to see them all dead and floating!


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PostPosted: Nov 9th, '18, 03:20 
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Here's a picture by the way.
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PostPosted: Nov 9th, '18, 09:10 
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Hi and welcome to the forum

Interesting little system

Below is a chart to help you keep a check on your safe ammonia levels , as temp and ph go up safe ammonia levels drop .

Get a API kit so you can check your Nitrate and Nitrite levels (Nitrite is the killer of fish)

Is the system outdoors or inside (light requirements)

Do you have a air pump as this is one area of concern (maybe not enough splash to aerate the water)

Once your fish grow and the fish waste increases its likely your little jets will block

Long term you haven't enough grow media (surface area for bacteria) to sustain all those fish so that will need more thought.

Generally accepted that around 20 Litres of WET grow media per eating size fish is best while learning aquaponics and avoiding the traps for beginners .

Goldfish are pretty tough so are a good choice while you are learning

Goldfish food is pretty well useless as a nutrient source for your plants

Most of us use aquaculture Fish food however it is developed for fish not plants so it can be low on iron and potassium, which of course are the common nutrients we often have to add .

If you use quality feed and a splash of seasol as required and you have enough light you will grow leafy greens easily.


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PostPosted: Nov 9th, '18, 16:34 
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Terra wrote:
Hi and welcome to the forum

Interesting little system

Below is a chart to help you keep a check on your safe ammonia levels , as temp and ph go up safe ammonia levels drop .

Get a API kit so you can check your Nitrate and Nitrite levels (Nitrite is the killer of fish)

Is the system outdoors or inside (light requirements)

Do you have a air pump as this is one area of concern (maybe not enough splash to aerate the water)

Once your fish grow and the fish waste increases its likely your little jets will block

Long term you haven't enough grow media (surface area for bacteria) to sustain all those fish so that will need more thought.

Generally accepted that around 20 Litres of WET grow media per eating size fish is best while learning aquaponics and avoiding the traps for beginners .

Goldfish are pretty tough so are a good choice while you are learning

Goldfish food is pretty well useless as a nutrient source for your plants

Most of us use aquaculture Fish food however it is developed for fish not plants so it can be low on iron and potassium, which of course are the common nutrients we often have to add .

If you use quality feed and a splash of seasol as required and you have enough light you will grow leafy greens easily.


Thank you! I'll put all of this into consideration.

This chart will definitely come in handy.

I don't have an air pump, but I do notice that the fish don't stay on the surface 24/7 (which I assume is a good thing)

I also have an API Kit. Can you elaborate how Nitrite is the killer of fish please?

The system is outdoors.


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PostPosted: Nov 9th, '18, 19:05 
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Nitrite is toxic for fish, as is ammonia, but in a different way.

Nitrite prevents blood haemoglobin from transporting oxygen, so fish are essentially damaged from lack of oxygen in their body tissues. When this gets bad dark blotches can be seen on the body of the fish. And of course, any level of nitrite will be more damaging to the fish if the water isn't well aerated.

If nitrite levels become a concern you should salt the system and aerate as much as possible.


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PostPosted: Nov 10th, '18, 08:12 
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danny wrote:
Nitrite is toxic for fish, as is ammonia, but in a different way.

Nitrite prevents blood haemoglobin from transporting oxygen, so fish are essentially damaged from lack of oxygen in their body tissues. When this gets bad dark blotches can be seen on the body of the fish. And of course, any level of nitrite will be more damaging to the fish if the water isn't well aerated.

If nitrite levels become a concern you should salt the system and aerate as much as possible.

Noted.
What are the dangerous levels of Nitrite?
I tested them just now and it's pretty much less than 0.25ppm. Ammonia was less than 0.25ppm as well.
And what do you mean by "salt the system" ? I have aqueous sodium bicarbonate with me. Would that count?


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PostPosted: Nov 10th, '18, 12:04 
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Any nitrite reading is dangerous as per Dannys explanation

We want a 0 reading always

Salt system 1 to 3 parts per thousand to help fish tolerate nitrite

So 1kg of salt per 1000 Litres of water is "One Part"

Use common salt with no additives , Swimming Pool salt is usually the easiest to find

With your little system you wont need much

Recommend that you stop feeding fish until system catches up conversion to nitrate and you have a zero nitrite reading a partial water change is a good short term immediate solution to lower nitrite .

Don't worry , Fish can go a long time between feeds , this was one of my hardest hurdles to understand after farming livestock all my life im used to feeding animals.

Ammonia is converted by bacteria to nitrite / nitrite is converted by a different bacteria to nitrate

So a spike in ammonia can be followed by a spike in nitrite , this damages fish and they start to die .

You will need to modify your system to handle the amount of fish waste you have (ammonia and solids)

The easiest system to learn on is a simple fish tank and gravel growbed

Water is pumped up to the grow bed and drains back to your fish tank , so maybe you can build something out of what you have lying around .

Have fun

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