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 Post subject: Polly Fishtank question
PostPosted: Jul 27th, '21, 21:41 
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Hi,

After moving house a few years back it's time to get back into aquaponics.
This time I have a bit more room so am hoping to build a larger system than my old 3000l ft, 3 x 600l gb setup which was sold with the house.
I have a couple of questions I am pondering and would welcome any advice.
I am looking at a 10000l tank "AP 10,000 Litre Aquaculture Tank" from "The water tank factory".
It comes with and without a base. If I go without a base I would look to install it in the ground. Does anyone have suggestions as to which option would be preferable? Without a base is a significant saving. I am located in the Northern Rivers in NSW.
Would putting it inground provide better insulation thus stabilizing water temp?
Any other pros/cons?
I haven't settled on a fish species yet but am considering silvers or maybe jades? I'm looking for something I can keep year round initially.



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PostPosted: Jul 27th, '21, 21:50 
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Sorry for the multiple posts. Looks like my client did something crazy. I don’t appear to be able to get rid of the other duplicates either.


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PostPosted: Jul 28th, '21, 03:57 
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Hmmm, that's a large tank for only 1 meter deep. I have a similar smaller 3400l tank system with the tank partially buried, set on foam insulation and wrapped with foam insulation. I don't think that burying the tank or the insulation does a bit of good due to the expanse of exposed water surface and pumping into the grow beds, etc.

If you are doing iavs with sand beds, then pumping direct from the FT to the beds is not a problem. Mine is aquaponics and with the FT as the lowest point, pumping from the FT creates solids separation challenges due to the pump macerating the solids. I used and oversize (250l) RFF with bird netting that works very well. But I had to make a special design because gravity flow from my RFF to so many beds did not work, so I made a capped version that could be pressurized. For my application this was the way to go, because I wanted a pond appearance sunken below my deck.

If I had a choice, I would recommend a smaller diameter tank that is taller and can be used with a SLO. Gravity flow to filters and beds is ideal, then pump clean water from the sump back to the FT.

There is a thread on here where someone made one of the nicest systems I've ever seen using a tank similar to the R9000. You could bury the R9000 partially so viewing and access are easier, but the water level is still high enough to use a SLO to feed the grow beds, etc. Sections of the top can be cut away for viewing and other access.

I'm sorry I can't remember what to search for on the other system I mentioned. I would like to include a link for you. If I find it I will provide the link.

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PostPosted: Jul 28th, '21, 05:57 
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Thanks for the input. What is the concern with the shallow tank? I thought larger area would be better rather than depth? It has a central drain so I could use that to remove solids or at least at the sort of my plan.


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PostPosted: Jul 30th, '21, 02:11 
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The main drawback of a shallow tank that I see is it makes it difficult for the FT to be the highest water level in the system, unless maybe placed on a slope or stand. But a tank that large makes both those things a bit more difficult. The other issues I can think of are the large surface area - possibly better for aeration, but worse for evaporation and more difficult to cover to help with things like algae growth, predators like birds and racoons, etc. With a water volume that large temperature changes are less of a problem. If you are raising catfish and a few other species then the larger surface area of the bottom and room to spread out is desirable.

If you plan to have the FT as the lowest point in the system already, then you will need to address the other challenges that come with that.

Another drawback of such a large system is access, harvesting, and critical problems. Several smaller systems may provide some protection from disease outbreak, pH changes, water quality, etc. You will also most likely be limited to a single fish species or species and size of fish.

Just my thoughts and opinions, ultimately you can make anything work, but I like to plan to avoid as many problems as possible.

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PostPosted: Aug 17th, '21, 19:24 
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dstjohn99 wrote:
The main drawback of a shallow tank that I see is it makes it difficult for the FT to be the highest water level in the system, unless maybe placed on a slope or stand. But a tank that large makes both those things a bit more difficult. The other issues I can think of are the large surface area - possibly better for aeration, but worse for evaporation and more difficult to cover to help with things like algae growth, predators like birds and racoons, etc. With a water volume that large temperature changes are less of a problem. If you are raising catfish and a few other species then the larger surface area of the bottom and room to spread out is desirable.

If you plan to have the FT as the lowest point in the system already, then you will need to address the other challenges that come with that.

Another drawback of such a large system is access, harvesting, and critical problems. Several smaller systems may provide some protection from disease outbreak, pH changes, water quality, etc. You will also most likely be limited to a single fish species or species and size of fish.

Just my thoughts and opinions, ultimately you can make anything work, but I like to plan to avoid as many problems as possible.

Hi, sorry for the slow reply.
My previous system had a 3000l pond as the lowest point. I guess I’m used to thinking of the FT as the lowest point and pumping up to the beds.
The place where I’m going to put the system is on a slope so either way is very possible, either the FT as highest or lowest point.
Again, I’m used to having an open pond/tank rather than an enclosed one. Not sure how a large water tank would go? I’m guessing or at least thought, that cutting a large part of the top away would reduce the integrety of the tank.
If I did go for a large tank. Like the R9000 as you suggest I could bury some of it that is for sure.

I guess If the tank was higher than the GBs I would need a sump tank. Wasn’t planning on that although I guess I could.
I was counting on pumping to the GBs especially due to the slope. Maybe my thinking is wrong?


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PostPosted: Aug 22nd, '21, 18:51 
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Any further thoughts on this?
I was going to go for the 10000l aquaculture tank but now as suggested leaning towards rainwater tanks instead.
I’m thinking that I will get two 5000l ones, one as a sump and one as a FT.
Although I’ll use both as FTs I guess really.
Cost wise there just isn’t much point in installing a small tank as the sump so might as well go for the 5000l one.
Going to push the button on the purchase pretty shortly.
The only other option I guess is to go for just one tank and use it as the sump anyway or as the lowest point being the FT, how ever you want to think of it I guess.
And if I did that I’d maybe get the bigger tank. Still thinking two tanks is better than one large one as I have more choice as to fish species etc in terms of being able to have two. Or even two lots of the same but at different sizes.
Any thoughts?


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PostPosted: Aug 24th, '21, 02:00 
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Only you know the layout that fits your space and works for you. Then you just need to engineer solutions for the issues that arise. I think you can cut two or three large holes in the top of a tank that will give you good access, but I would leave "spokes" and use large radiuses in the corners to maintain strength and shape.

With the FT as the lowest, you need to consider having the pump at the bottom to get the solids out, but also if something goes wrong make sure the pump doesn't remove all the water and the fish die. The solids going through the pump make them more difficult to separate, so special consideration for the filter used.

If you use sand for grow media then you don't need any solids filtration. Many people even use gravel beds without any solids filtration. I find that with a fair amount of fish, the growbeds gunk up without a solids filter, so I have always used RFF type filters.

However, I am using sand in a few beds now and I like the simplicity of no filter at all.

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9 kW Solar Electric 2011 - Upgraded to 12 kW 2019

"Aquaponics...solar-powered nanotechnology that produces fresh vegetables and meat, while purifying water..." - Rick Op, Houston Texas.


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